About

It is our vision to assist researchers, communities and policymakers to adapt to, mitigate and prepare for current and future effects of climate change and migration on health and health services, and to develop resilient, inclusive and responsive health systems.

About

It is our vision to assist researchers, communities and policymakers to adapt to, mitigate and prepare for current and future effects of climate change and migration on health and health services, and to develop resilient, inclusive and responsive health systems.

How climate change, migration and health interact

During 2020, more than 30 million people were driven from their homes by extreme weather conditions. That number is expected to rise as climate change acts as a “threat multiplier” for migration, through its intersection with economic, political and social drivers of mobility.

Sudden onset climate hazards like floods and cyclones, and slow-onset climate hazards like sea level rise and drought can trigger people to migrate.

Whether people move, who moves, and how they move depends however on many factors including socio-economic status, social connections, legal barriers to movement and their capacity to move in terms of health and wealth.

Climate mobility can be rural-urban migration, displacement, planned relocation, or cross-border migration. In other situations, people may be immobile or become trapped, meaning they cannot move to another location.

Climighealth - Forrest

Climate change and its related mobility responses, both coined as one of the main public health crises of the 21st century, often have adverse, and sometimes beneficial, effects on health and health systems.

While people moving for climate change may not have different health needs to migrants moving for other reasons, the main health issues in this context include: changing patterns of infectious disease, new or exacerbated health issues related to underlying non-communicable diseases (NCDs), or difficulties in NCD management, and psycho-social health issues.

Climate threats may also push those with the poorest health to places with fragmented access to health care, exacerbating their health needs.

Health services often struggle to ensure adequate and equitable access to care for those affected, and to meet the changing needs of dynamic (mobile, sending and host) populations.

How climate change, migration and health interact

During 2020, more than 30 million people were driven from their homes by extreme weather conditions. That number is expected to rise as climate change acts as a “threat multiplier” for migration, through its intersection with economic, political and social drivers of mobility.

Sudden onset climate hazards like floods and cyclones, and slow-onset climate hazards like sea level rise and drought can trigger people to migrate.

Whether people move, who moves, and how they move depends however on many factors including socio-economic status, social connections, legal barriers to movement and their capacity to move in terms of health and wealth.

Climate mobility can be rural-urban migration, displacement, planned relocation, or cross-border migration. In other situations, people may be immobile or become trapped, meaning they cannot move to another location.

Climighealth - Polution

Climate change and its related mobility responses, both coined as one of the main public health crises of the 21st century, often have adverse, and sometimes beneficial, effects on health and health systems.

While people moving for climate change may not have different health needs to migrants moving for other reasons, the main health issues in this context include: changing patterns of infectious disease, new or exacerbated health issues related to underlying non-communicable diseases (NCDs), or difficulties in NCD management, and psycho-social health issues.

Climate threats may also push those with the poorest health to places with fragmented access to health care, exacerbating their health needs.

Health services often struggle to ensure adequate and equitable access to care for those affected, and to meet the changing needs of dynamic (mobile, sending and host) populations.

Climighealth - Forrest

Mission

To realize our vision, CliMigHealth is set up as an international, interdisciplinary network which aims to explore the climate-migration-health nexus. To this end, CliMigHealth integrates diverse expertise on the various dimensions of and interactions in the nexus, cutting across disciplines.

CliMigHealth guides more comprehensive and sustainable responses to address the complex migration and health(care) issues arising from climate change. Particular focus is on strengthening interdisciplinary research, educational and knowledge translation capacity, especially in low- and middle income countries.

CliMigHealth primarily forms a collaborative and knowledge platform between academic institutions, NGOs and individuals in the North and in the South. The network is composed in such a way that involvement from and ownership by the South is secured, thereby integrating a human rights based and equity-focused socially accountable multi-perspective approach.

Strategy and activities

To achieve our vision and implement the mission, we apply a multifaceted, interdisciplinary and international strategy with researchers and civil society from different sectors and countries joining forces. By focusing on activities related to not only research, but also education and public awareness, CliMigHealth ultimately aims to make (health) systems more climate-resilient and migration-inclusive. With the planet imminently reaching tipping points where global heating will accelerate, and efforts to mitigate will no longer be our sole way out, there is no time to waste – we are living in the adaptation era and the time to act and adapt is now.

The network will engage with the following activities that follow the overarching strategy:

Research

Research within CliMigHealth is interdisciplinary, embraces a wide variety of methodologies and fosters collaboration between and within researchers in the South and the North.

This allows evaluation of health-determining interventions at micro, meso and macro level with special attention to what works, for whom and how.

Interdisciplinary (health, social and political, environmental sciences and economics) research findings are integrated to inform policy(makers).

  • Collecting ‘grass root’ information on the impact of the nexus on affected and at risk populations.
  • Increasing the knowledge base and understanding of the nexus’ complex mechanisms.
  • Developing meaningful solutions to address the health effects of climate change and migration.

Education

CliMigHealth supports and develops interdisciplinary and global education programs, including under- and postgraduate training and curricula, workshops and summer schools.

The target audience are exchange students, junior and senior researchers, and non-academic partners with various backgrounds, interests and nationalities.

Emphasis lies on climate- and migration-related health, interdisciplinary exchange, methods, representation, system and complexity thinking.

  • Fostering double PhD programs, South-to-North student and researcher mobility, and research stays in affected areas.
  • Organizing interdisciplinary summer schools on the interactions between climate, migration and health(care).
  • Developing postgraduate training and curricula on the nexus within a broader one health/planetary health approach.

Public Awareness

CliMigHealth builds on the solid expertise of the network partners to translate knowledge to the publica and decision makers in comprehensible messages.

As a knowledge platform on the climate-migration-health nexus, we provide input for information seekers and raise awareness among the general public.

Key outputs will focus on the use of multimedia, arts, hybrid virtual and physical exhibitions, events and interactive tools.

  • Offer understandable information and advise to public and private policymakers, and the general public (on request or on own initiative).
  • Organise participatory knowledge transfer of evidence-based information with civil society organisations and local stakeholders.
  • Provide scientific input for NGOs and activist organizations with an emphasis on independence and scientific integrity.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Thank you for subscribing to our newsletter!
There was an error trying to send your message. Please try again.